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913 E North Blvd
Leesburg, FL 34748

May 2021

Monday, 24 May 2021 00:00

What Is Achilles Tendinopathy?

The Achilles tendon is a large tendon which is located on the back of the ankle. This tendon connects the heel bone to the calf muscle. It is also the strongest tendon in the body, allowing you to push your body onto the tip toes, but the tendon also bears a lot of stress. When the tendon experiences an increased or abnormal amount of stress from activities such as running, jumping, or standing for long periods, it can become painful, swollen, and stiff. This is known as Achilles tendinopathy. Some factors that contribute to Achilles tendinopathy may include age, weight, tightness in the calves or stiff foot joints. If you are experiencing pain or tenderness in the Achilles tendon, consulting with a podiatrist is highly suggested due to the potential severity of the condition worsening overtime.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Nicholas Przystawski of Central Florida Foot Care, PA. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Leesburg, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

What Causes Cuboid Syndrome?

Cuboid syndrome is a condition in which the cuboid bone, located in the middle of the foot, becomes misaligned. This usually occurs as the result of an acute injury, such as an ankle sprain, or from repetitive impacts from activities like running or dancing. The cuboid bone moves out of its normal position when the ligaments between the cuboid and other bones in the foot are overstretched or torn. If you have this condition, you may feel pain, discomfort, or weakness along the outer edge of the foot. Placing weight on the affected foot may be painful and make standing and walking difficult. You may also notice mild swelling and bruising on the outside and bottom of the foot. If you are experiencing the symptoms of cuboid syndrome, please see a podiatrist for treatment.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Nicholas Przystawski from Central Florida Foot Care, PA. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Leesburg, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Pregnancy causes many changes in your body, including your feet. Swelling in the feet or ankles (edema) may occur, especially at the end of the day or after spending time on your feet. You can help alleviate this discomfort by elevating your feet whenever you get the chance, keeping yourself hydrated, wearing comfortable shoes with low heels, exercising your feet by rotating them and flexing them up and down, and sleeping on your left side to help circulation. While edema will normally subside after pregnancy, an increase in your foot’s size may not. A hormone called relaxin is released during pregnancy to prepare your body for birth, which can also relax the ligaments in your feet, causing them to lengthen and widen. To keep your feet as comfortable as possible during pregnancy, wear flat or low-heeled shoes with good arch support. As you advance in your pregnancy, you may want to avoid laces and opt for slip-on shoes, and always check your foot size before buying new shoes. For more information on how to properly care for and dress your feet during pregnancy, consult with a podiatrist.

Getting the right shoe size is an important part of proper foot health. Seek the assistance of Dr. Nicholas Przystawski from Central Florida Foot Care, PA. Our doctor will provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Getting the Right Shoe Size

There are many people who wear shoes that are the incorrect size, negatively affecting their feet and posture. Selecting the right shoes is not a difficult process, so long as you keep several things in mind when it comes to choosing the right pair.

  • When visiting the shoe store, use the tools available to measure your foot.
  • Be sure there is ‘wiggle room’. There should be about an inch between your toes and the tip of your shoes.
  • Do not always assume you are the same size, as manufacturers run differently.
  • Purchase shoes later in the day, as your feet swell as the day progresses.
  • If a shoe is not comfortable, it is not suitable. Most shoes can’t be ‘broken in’, and comfort should be the ultimate goal when it comes to choosing the right pair of shoes

As our feet hold our body weight and keep us moving, it is important to treat them right. Picking the right pair of shoes can provide your feet comfort and mobility without pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Leesburg, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Foot wounds are sores, cuts, or scrapes that can appear on the feet. If you have systemic conditions such as diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, or poor circulation, these wounds may heal slowly and poorly, resulting in potentially serious complications, from infection to amputation. If you notice a wound on your foot, you should protect the wound from bacteria immediately. Wash the wound thoroughly with clean water, then apply an antibiotic ointment. Cover the wound with a bandage, as leaving the wound open to air might allow bacteria to multiply on and infect the wound. Change the bandage and repeat this process every one to two days. Keep pressure off the wound by resting the affected foot. Your doctor may also suggest wearing specialized shoes or socks to offload pressure. If you have a foot wound, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Nicholas Przystawski from Central Florida Foot Care, PA. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Leesburg, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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